Oops! Environmental Poetics

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Add to Cart. Product Highlights Grassroots movements in poor communities and communities of color strive to protect neighborhoods and worksites from environmental degradation and struggle to gain equal access to the natural resources that sustain their cultures. It offers new case studies of native Alaskans' protests over radiation poisoning; Hispanos' struggles to protect their land and water rights; Pacific Islanders' resistance to nuclear weapons testing and nuclear waste storage; and the efforts of women employees of maquiladoras to obtain safer living and working environments along the U.

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The book closes with a section of essays that offer models to teachers hoping to incorporate these issues and texts into their classrooms. By combining this array of perspectives, this book makes the field of environmental justice more accessible to scholars, students, and concerned readers. About This Item We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer. From the First National People of Color Congress on Environmental Leadership to WTO street protests of the new millennium, environmental justice activists have challenged the mainstream movement by linking social inequalities to the uneven distribution of environmental dangers.

This book examines environmental justice in its social, economic, political, and cultural dimensions in both local and global contexts, with special attention paid to intersections of race, gender, and class inequality.

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This collection approaches environmental justice concerns from diverse geographical, ethnic, and disciplinary perspectives, always viewing environmental issues as integral to problems of social inequality and oppression. The selections also include cultural analyses of environmental justice arts, such as community art and greening projects in inner-city Baltimore, and literary analyses of writers such as Jimmy Santiago Baca, Linda Hogan, Barbara Neely, Nez Perce orators, Ken Saro-Wiwa, and Karen Yamashita--artists who address issues such as toxicity and cancer, lead poisoning of urban African American communities, and Native American struggles to remove dams and save salmon.

Activism as Affirmation: Gender and Environmental Justice in Linda Hogan's Solar Storms and Barbara Neely's Blanche From the First National People of Color Congress on Environmental Leadership to WTO street protests of the new millennium, environmental justice activists have challenged the mainstream movement by linking social inequalities to the uneven distribution of environmental dangers.

The selections also include cultural analyses of environmental justice arts, such as community art and greening projects in inner-city Baltimore, and literary analyses of writers such as Jimmy Santiago Baca, Linda Hogan, Barbara Neely, Nez Perce orators, Ken Saro-Wiwa, and Karen Yamashita—artists who address issues such as toxicity and cancer, lead poisoning of urban African American communities, and Native American struggles to remove dams and save salmon.

An entire critical heritage has taken Hazlitt's position, a position reinforced by Keats when he spoke in a letter of "the wordsworthian or egotistical sublime," 3 a characterization that would come to be, as Paul Fry observes, "the singlemost tyrannical notion governing preconceptions about Wordsworth to this day. Throughout this critical history, the charge of egotism or subjectivism has been closely allied with the idea that Wordsworth is preeminently a poet guilty of what John Ruskin termed the pathetic fallacy.

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Not only does he impose his interpretation on things that would otherwise tell for themselves, as Hazlitt gripes; he habitually misperceives things to begin with by projecting his own thoughts and feelings onto them. Ruskin defined the pathetic fallacy as that "state of mind" which produces "a falseness in all our impressions of external things. Wherever we find a description of nature as charged with emotion, as somehow moving or even speaking to the perceiver, what is being described is not really nature at all, but only the person looking at it--not "immediate effect," in Hazlitt's terms, not a "thing that tells for itself," but "interpretation.

Drawing a parallel between a poetics that saturates the natural world with private feelings and an idealist philosophy that holds "it does not much matter what things are in themselves, but only what they are to us,"" Ruskin like Hazlitt casts Wordsworth as a poet who makes the outer world a reflex of personal affect, an emblem of the self, rather than offering materially accurate images of things themselves.

Critics of quite different stripes have agreed that Wordsworth's descriptions of nature are not to be trusted. They disagree as to whether, or to what degree, his disingenuous engagement with nature--and his body of work as a whole--is to be censured or applauded.


  1. The Golden Horizon.
  2. The Secret of St. Claire.
  3. What Is the Purpose of Achieving Poetics in Design?.

Among the positive readings are Geoffrey Hartman's classic analysis of Wordsworth as a poet of transcendent, "essentially apocalyptic" imagination," who repeatedly turns and returns to nature to shield himself from his own visionary power and its disturbing implications. An unknown error has occurred.